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Feature Article


Ying and Yang in TaeKwon-Do and Life
by
Julia Jennings


The Center of the Picture: The girl consists of a Yin and Yang. The rest of the drawing is almost entirely based off of this.

The picture contains elements of:

Good verses Evil,
Logic verses Creativity,
Fear verses Reality, and
Self-Control verses Aggression.

The opposites have a lot to do with TaeKwon-Do and everyday life. In TaeKwon-Do you are always struggling to keep a balance between the opposites whether it be kicking a bag held by a taller higher ranked person, then switching directly to a smaller, lower ranked person, or sparring logically all the while sparring creatively, or even just being nice to someone, could, possibly be struggle.

Of course, if we have all of the opposites, then what will unite them? Well, the answer is in the three golden symbols. The first being the Mind and the second one being the Spirit, and the third being the Body. They are all gold and plain because they all help each other. They are different because, they all resist each other. Although the symbols don’t unite the opposites, quite like their “container” or their person do. As complicated and (probably) poetic as that sounds, it is actually very simple: many different opposites live in just one person. Just like the girl that is drawn here.

The Picture was divided into nine 8”x10” picture frames. Displayed on the wall at the dojang (school), they form the complete picture. By viewing the enlargement of the picture, at the bottom of this page, you will be able to see the detailed work put into this amazing illustration by Miss. Jennings.



1
The illustration was sectioned into Nine 8" x 10" picture frames.


2
The nine picture frames with then moved into horizontal 3 rows.


3
The top row was moved down. the bottom row up until the frames touched.



4
This is how it appears on the wall.
Click on this picture to see the full-size image.



Copyright © 1998- James S. Benko and ITA Institute.
All rights reserved.

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